Bannu beautiful District of Pakistan. Bannu Division of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province in Pakistan. It was recorded as a district in 1861 during the British Raj. The district Bannu is approximately 192 kilometers to the south of Peshawar and lies in a sedimentary basin. It is flanked and guarded on all sides by the hard and dried mountain ranges of Koh-e-Safed and Koh-e-Suleiman. It is a scenic part of the southern region, due to the Kurrum river and its tributaries.

They have made it a land of meadows, crops and orchards. Every kind of crop and fruit can be grown in it, but the banana, dates, figs and rice are unique in their taste, smell and shape. Geographically, the modern day Bannu is located in the heart of the southern region with its boundaries touching the districts of Karak, Lakki Marwat and the North, South Wazirestan Agencies. Bannu Beautiful District of Pakistan.

Demographics of Bannu Beautiful District of Pakistan

Total population of the district is  estimated 677350 (1998 Census) with annual growth rate of 2.81 %. The total area of the district is 1,227 square kilometers with total Number of Union Councils 49 with 2 Tehsils. Its literacy Rate is 32.11%. Main clans are Banizeei, Niazi ,Wazer , Marwats and Abbasies. Other tribes include Bhittaan, Syeds and Awan. Most of the population are Muslims 99.5%. The Main Languages are Pashto 98.3%; Urdu and Punjabi 1.03%. The literacy rate is 32.11%. The economically active population is 18.97% of the total population. The main occupations are Professionals 5.7%; Agriculture workers 39%, elementary occupations 23.7%, Service and shop workers 9.23%, Craft and related trade workers 6% others 16.2%.

The District forms a basin drained by two rivers from the hills of Waziristan, the Kurram and the Gambila or Tochi. The valley of Bannu properly stretching to the foot of the frontier hills, forms an irregular oval, measuring 60 miles (100 km) from north to south and about 40 miles (60 km) from east to west.

HISTORY of Bannu Beautiful District of Pakistan

The history of Bannu goes back many years, due to its strategic location there are many historical relics dating back to the 2nd Century BC. The Akra mounds are one of the relics from the ancient Indus Valley Civilization. There are also relics left behind by Central Asian Invaders in route to the sub-continent. Many theories have been proposed about the origin of the word “Bannu”. But the most widely recognized view is that the word “Bannu” is derived from “Bano.” Bano was the wife of Shah Farid alias the founder of the present day Bannu and the founder of Banouchi Tribes. Bano was the sister of Rustum and the daughter of Zalizar and when she was married to Shah Farid, Rustum conferred upon her as dowry. After the annexation of the Punjab, which then included the NWFP, the valley was administered by Herbert Edwardes so thoroughly that it became a source of strength instead of weakness during the Indian Rebellion of 1857.

Historic Background

The modern district of Bannu was originally a tehsil of the old Bannu district of British India, in the Derajat Division of the North-West Frontier Province. The capital Bannu in the northwest corner of the district was the base for expeditions by troops of the British empire to the Tochi Valley and the Waziristan frontier, a military road led from Bannu town towards Dera Ismail Khan. The district of Bannu equivalent to the now defunct Bannu Division, upon the creation of the North-West Frontier Province in 1901, contained an area of 1,680 mi² (4,350 km²) lying north of the Indus, the cis-Indus portions of Bannu was ceded to Mianwali District of the Punjab. In 1901 the population was 231,485, of whom the great majority were Muslims.The current district of Bannu was created in 1990, when Bannu Division was separated from Dera Ismail Khan Division.

What Not to Do

Do not Photograph bridges and military installations,
Do not swim in the rivers
Do not Travel without your passport and other travel documents in the Northern Areas.
Do not Photograph local women without his permission . 
Do not Drive on mountain roads at night.

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